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Money comes from work…

28 Feb

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One of the most important lessons that John and I want to teach the kids is that money comes from work. I want them to equal money with work so that when they are older, they do not have a welfare mentality. I don’t want them to feel as though they deserve anything without putting work into it. The only way to build a muscle is to exercise it. The only way to build the work=money muscle is to give them a job. They already have a list of chores that they must complete each week to get paid. No work = no pay. That is a real life lesson. But there are times when we need extra things done around the homestead and they need extra money so the two pair up nicely. That was the case this past weekend. Josh had $8 from this last paycheck but he wanted to go play air-soft with some friends. I called and was told that the cost was $15 to play. So, he had a shortfall.

Lucky for him, John pulled into the drive way with Big Willie (our Econoline van) full of wood that needed to be hauled to the back yard and stacked up. We negotiated a payment of $7 for Josh to help John haul it all back there. And it was  a lot of wood…

firewood

But the important thing is that he did it. And it wasn’t exactly with a great attitude especially since he got hurt twice (once he dropped wood on his foot and the other time he walked into my garden fence) but he pressed on and finished the job. And he got paid. The good news is that he got to play air-soft with his buddies and one of them even had a coupon making the cost only $11 – enough leftover to buy his own Mello Yellow, which of course, we made him pay for.

And Josh learned a valuable lesson that day. He learned that money comes from work and the best place for a broke person to go is to work. He also learned to take pride in what he does and that he has skills that are marketable. So, what will you teach your kids about money and work? Hopefully a lesson that will carry them through to adulthood. As a wise person once told me, we aren’t raising children, we are raising future adults.

 
 

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  1. Jonathan Wyatt

    February 28, 2013 at 12:01 pm

    We did something like that with Noah, even though he is only 5, he wanted a ice pop, and we told him if you want special treats then you have to do a chore to earn that special treat. We told him pick up the playroom and he did, by himself so he could have that ice pop.

     
    • tiffanyrodi

      February 28, 2013 at 12:46 pm

      Exactly. Equating work with reward/money.

       
 
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